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Machynlleth

 

Machynlleth

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Skinner's Arms, Machynlleth. Photograph © Gwilym Owen

Machynlleth (sometimes abbreviated to Mach) is a market town in the traditional county of Montgomeryshire (Sir Drefaldwyn), north Powys in Wales. It is in the Dyfi Valley, and is at the intersection of the A487 and the A489. It had a population of about 2,000 people according to the 2001 census.

It was the seat of Owain Glyndŵr's Welsh Parliament in 1404, and as such claims to be the "ancient capital of Wales." It applied for city status in the 2000 and 2002 competitions.

Machynlleth has a market day every Wednesday with a wide variety of stalls and sellers including gardening, fruit and veg, local food producers, music, crafts.

Machynlleth hosted the National Eisteddfod in 1937 and 1981.

History
From 1859 to 1948 it was served by the narrow-gauge Corris Railway, which brought slate from the quarries around Corris and Aberllefenni for onward despatch to the markets.

Machynlleth main-line station was built by the Newtown and Machynlleth Railway, and continues to provide a link to Aberystwyth and the Cambrian coast line to the west and Newtown and Shrewsbury to the east.

The daughter of local landowner Sir John Edwards married Viscount Seaham, the second son of the third Marquess of Londonderry, and they set up home in Plas Machynlleth. He became Earl Vane on the death of his father and the fifth Marquess on the death of his half-brother. To celebrate the 21st birthday of their son, Viscount Castlereagh, the townspeople subscribed to the erection (at the town's main road intersection) of the Clock Tower, which has become widely known as the symbol of Machynlleth. Another son, Lord Herbert Vane-Tempest, was the last member of the family to live at the Plas and was killed in the Abermule train collision on the Cambrian Railways, of which he was a director. The house was given to the townspeople after World War II. In recent years it was converted into the Celtica visitor centre.

Tourism
From 1995 until 2006, Celtica showcased Celtic life using audio-visual displays and exhibitions. Often hyped as having significant cultural importance, it always suffered from poor visitor numbers which ultimately forced its closure. Powys County Council are responsible for deciding what will become of the large mansion-style building gifted to the people of Machynlleth, but talk around town is that it will probably become a new set of council offices.

Even with the current closure of Celtica the primary employment sector remains tourism with a wide range of activity based attractions (for example several mountain bike trails) as well as visitor centres (Centre for Alternative Technology). Agriculture clearly continues to play a significant part in the make-up of the town and surrounding area as well. Another important local industry and employer is the renewable energy sector. The area now has a rapidly expanding renewable energy industry with several small to medium sized companies now operating in or around the town.

The town has a large market on Wednesdays which appeals to both locals and tourists. The Wales Museum of Modern Art, MOMA, presents lunchtime talks and performances on market days.


 Trains in Machynlleth: Machynlleth is on The Cambrian Line


 Museums in Machynlleth: MOMA, Wales


 Theatre in Machynlleth: The Tabernacle


 Golf in Machynlleth:
 Machynlleth Golf Club
       Newton Road
       Felingerrig
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8DU
 01654 702000


 Libraries in Machynlleth:
 Machynlleth Library
       Maengwyn Street
       Machynlleth
       Powys SY20 8DY
 01654 702322
 Mon 9:30am-1:00pm 2:00pm- 7:00am
       Tue 9:30am-1:00pm 2:00pm- 5:00am
       Wed 9:30am-1:00pm 2:00pm- 5:00am
       Fri 9:30am-1:00pm 2:00pm- 7:00am
       Sat 9:30am-1:00pm


 Rugby in Machynlleth: Machynlleth RFC


 Taxis in Machynlleth:
 Lynton Taxis
       Nythfa Tan-yr-Allt Corris
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 9RL
 01654 702124

 M E Rowlands Taxis
       Cwm Dylluan Forge
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8RZ
 01654 702048


 Vets in Machynlleth:
 E L L Williams
       Station Yard
       Cemmaes Rd
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8LA
 01650 511597

 Cambrian Veterinary Centre
       Graigle
       Graig Fach
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8BB
 01654 702444


 Tourist Information Centres in Machynlleth

 Telephone:

01654 702401

 Fax:

01654 703675

 Email:

mactic@powys.gov.uk

 Address:

Royal House
Penrallt Street
Machynlleth
SY20 8AG

 Hours:

Winter 7 Days 9:30-17:00
Summer
7 Days 9:30 - 17:30


 Pubs/Bars in Machynlleth:
 The Black Lion Inn

       Derwenlas
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8TN
 01654 703913

 Dyfi Forester Inn

       4 Heol Y Doll
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8BQ

 Glyndwr Hotel
       14 Heol Y Doll
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8BQ

 The Red Lion

       11 Maengwyn St
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8AA
 01654 703323

 The Skinners Arms
       16 Penrallt Street
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8AJ
 01654 702354

 Tafarn Dwynant Inn
       Ceinws
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 9HA
 01654 761660

 The White Lion Hotel
       10 Heol Pentrerhedyn
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8DN
 01654 703455

 The Wynnstay Arms Hotel
       Heol Maengwyn
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8AE
 01654 70 2941


 Hotels in Machynlleth:
 Glyndwr Hotel
       14 Doll Street
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8BQ
 01654 703989

 Plas Dolguog Hotel
       Felingerrig
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8UJ
 01654 702244

 Riverside Hotel
       Pennal
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 9DW
 01654 791285

 White Lion Hotel
       Heol Pentrerhedyn
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8DN
 01654 703455

 Wynnstay Hotel
       Heol Maengwyn
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8AE
 01654 702941


 B&B's/Guesthouses
 Cwm Dylluan>
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8RZ 
 01654 702684
 01654 702684
 gwilym@cwmdylluan.wanadoo.co.uk
 http://www.cwmdylluan.co.uk

 Dyfiguest B&B
       20 Ffordd Mynydd Griffiths
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8DD 
 01654 702562
 dyfiguest@yahoo.co.uk
 http://www.dyfiguest.co.uk

 Eryl House B&B
       Newtown road
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8EY 
 01654 703591
 01654 703591
 erylbandb@homecall.co.uk
 http://www.erylhouse.co.uk

 Pendre Guest House
       103 Heol Maengwyn
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8EE
 01654 702088


 Campsites/Caravans in Machynlleth:
 Jones
       Gwerniago
       Pennal
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 9JX
 01654 791227


 Restaurants in Machynlleth:
 Maengwyn Cafe & Restaurant
       57 Heol Maengwyn
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8EE
 01654 702126

 Maharani Indian Restaurant
       21 Penrallt Street
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8AG
 01654 703088


 Cafes in Machynlleth:
 The Quarry Cafe
       Glasgow House
       13 Heol Maengwyn
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8EB
 01654 702624

 Rendezvous
       Heol Maengwyn
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8EB
 01654 702326


 Take Aways in Machynlleth:
 BJ's Bistro
       39 Maengwyn Street
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8EB
 01654 703679

 China Garden Take Away
       40 Heol Maengwyn
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8DT
 01654 703080

 Dicks Diner (Fish and Chips)
       44 Heol Maengwyn
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8DT
 01654 703346

 National Milk Bar
       17-19 Penrallt Street
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8AG
 01654 702787

 Richard Roberts
       Heol Iorwerth
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8HS
 01654 703220

 Town Kebab House
       49 Heol Maengwyn
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8EB
 01654 702249


 For Children in Machynlleth:
 Machynlleth After School Club
       Sant Mair
       Heol Maengwyn
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8EF
 01654 702586

 Machynlleth Community Nursery
       Machynlleth Nursery/Plas Grounds
       Machgwyn Street
       Penegoes
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8UW,
 01654 702933


 Riding in Machynlleth:
 Carreg Dressage
       Penegoes
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8NW
 01650 511222


 Other in Machynlleth:
 Machynlleth Bowling Club
       Cae Crwn
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8HF
 01654 702628


 Places of Worship in Machynlleth:
 St Peters Parish Church
       Penrallt Street
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8AG
 01654 702261


 Schools/Colleges in Machynlleth:
 Machynlleth C.P. School (Primary)
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8HE
 01654 702386

 Ysgol Bro Ddyfi (Secondary)
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8DR
 01654 702012
 01654 702994


 Chemists/Pharmacies in Machynlleth:
 Rowlands Pharmacy
       8 Pentre Hedyn Street
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8DN
 01654 702237


 Doctors/GPs in Machynlleth:
 Drs R Tedders & S Morpeth
       Glantwymyn Health Centre
       Cemmaes Road
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8LB
 01650 511227

 Machynlleth Health Centre
       Forge Road
       Machynlleth
       Powys
       SY20 8EQ
 01654 702224


Machynlleth (Machynllaeth) - From 'A Topographical Dictionary of Wales' (1849)
MACHYNLLETH (MACHYNLLAETH), a market-town and borough; a parish comprising the three townships of Machynlleth otherwise Y Dre, Is-y-Garreg, and Uwch-y-Garreg; and the head of a union; in the Lower division of the hundred of Machynlleth, county of Montgomery, North Wales; containing 2482 inhabitants, of whom 1636 are in the township of Machynlleth, 39 miles (W. by N.) from Montgomery, and 209 (W. N. W.) from London. This place, which is of considerable antiquity, is supposed to have been the site of the Maglona of the Itineraries, a Roman station, where, in the reign of the Emperor Honorius, the captain of the "Numerus Solensium" was posted, under the Dux Britanniarum, to keep the mountaineers in subjection. Connected with the principal station, which occupied the highest part of the hill, was an outwork called Cevn Caer, or "the ridge of the city," about four miles from the present town, in the adjoining parish of Pennal, in the county of Merioneth: there were formerly some remains of the outwork, and several Roman coins have been at various times discovered there. Few circumstances of historical importance connected with Machynlleth are recorded. In 1402, Owain Glyndwr, flushed with repeated successes, assembled the estates of the principality in the town, where he held a parliament, that solemnly acknowledged his title to the sovereignty of Wales, of which kingdom he caused himself to be formally invested with the crown. At this parliament Davydd Gam, who had married the sister of Owain Glyndwr, but was, notwithstanding, a zealous partisan and adherent of Henry IV., attended, apparently for the purpose of promoting Owain's pretensions to the crown, but with the disguised intention of assassinating that chieftain. In this attempt, however, he was frustrated by a timely discovery of his treachery; and, being seized and imprisoned, he would have been instantly executed but for the intercession of Owain's most zealous friends and partisans. In resentment for his treachery, Owain burnt Davydd's house and laid waste his lands, and detained him in confinement at Machynlleth till the year 1412, when he was finally ransomed by his father and other vassals of the English crown. Charles I., when on his route to Chester, had a bed prepared for him in a house in the town, called "the Garrison;" the bed and furniture, which have been carefully preserved, are now deposited at Esgair Llyveren, in the county of Merioneth.

The town is situated near the western extremity of the county, about a quarter of a mile from the southern bank of the river Dovey, and on the turnpike-road leading to Aberystwith from the principal parts of North Wales, and also from Shrewsbury. It is romantically embosomed in mountains that encompass it on every side, and from which a beautiful view is obtained of the Vale of Dovey, abounding in highly picturesque and richly diversified scenery, with the winding course of the river, from above the parish of Cemmes to its influx into the bay of Cardigan. The streets are wide and spacious, the houses in general neat and well built; and the whole town, which is amply supplied with water, has a regular and prepossessing appearance. A book society has been some time established, and is much patronized. The environs are pleasant, comprehending much beautiful scenery and many interesting objects. At Uwch-yGarreg, a township in the parish, is Pistyll Rhaiadr, one of the finest waterfalls in the principality: though inferior to some in the beauty of the scenery immediately adjoining, it is not surpassed in romantic grandeur by any. The Dovey is celebrated for its salmon-fishing.

The manufacture of flannels, principally of the coarser kind, is carried on to a considerable extent, and some webs are also made. In this manufacture more than forty carding-engines and seven fullingmills are employed in the town and its vicinity; the weaving is done by the workmen at their own dwellings, and about 200 pieces, averaging about 150 yards each, are sent to the market held at Newtown, every alternate Thursday. Lead-ore is found in the parish, and mines of that metal have been opened in the township of Is-y-Garreg; but they are not at present in operation: there are quarries of good slate, some of which are worked upon a moderate scale. The river Dovey is navigable to Derwenlâs, within two miles of the town, and affords a facility of conveying the produce of the quarries and mines to their destination, and of supplying the neighbourhood with various commodities. The average annual exports from this place are, 500 tons of bark, 40,000 feet of oak timber, 150,000 yards of oak poles for collieries, 100 tons of lead-ore, and 1500 tons of slate. The average imports are, 5000 quarters of rye and wheat, 1000 tons of coal, 500 tons of culm, 2000 tons of limestone, 11,000 English and foreign hides, and groceries and other shop goods to the amount of £14,000 in value. The market is on Wednesday. Fairs are held annually on the first Wednesday in March, on May 16th, June 26th, July 9th, August 7th, September 18th, October 21st, and November 26th, for cattle, horses, and wares: a statute fair, also, occurs on the Wednesday before Easter.

This place, as a contributory borough, together with Llanidloes, Welshpool, and Llanvyllin, returned a member for Montgomery. The elective franchise was granted in the 27th of Henry VIII., and was exercised by the boroughs for many years without interruption. Eventually, however, it underwent important alteration. On a petition to the House of Commons, in 1685, complaining of an undue return, it was resolved that the right of election was vested in the burgesses not only of Montgomery, but also of Llanidloes, Welshpool, and Llanvyllin, no mention being made of Machynlleth; and on a similar petition, presented to the Commons in 1728, it was resolved that the elective franchise was confined solely to the borough of Montgomery, which then continued to return the member, to the exclusion of the other towns. These resolutions being at variance with each other, the burgesses of Llanidloes, Llanvyllin, and Welshpool, and also those of Machynlleth, the latter having neglected to support their claim at the two former periods, were allowed the privilege, by a statute of the 28th of George III., of asserting their claim to join in choosing a member for Montgomery before any future committee of the House, and of appealing against any subsequent decision within twelve calendar months. No practical benefit, however, appears to have resulted from this privilege. By the act of 1832, for "Amending the Representation," the town was again declared one of the contributory boroughs within the county to return one member to parliament. The right of election is vested in every male person of full age occupying, either as owner, or as tenant under the same landlord, a house or other premises in the borough of the annual value of at least £10, provided he be capable of registering as the act demands; and the number of tenements of this value within the limits of the borough, which are minutely detailed in the Appendix, is about a hundred. Since 1832, the contributory boroughs, besides Montgomery, have consisted of Machynlleth, Llanidloes, Welshpool, Llanvyllin, and the newly-created borough of Newtown. The election of the knight of the shire takes place here or at Montgomery, being the towns at which the ancient county court is held alternately. The town is also one of the polling-places in the election for the shire. The town-hall, or market-house, a plain and commodious building, was erected in 1783, by Sir W. W. Wynn, Bart., grandfather of the present owner of Wynnstay, who is lord of the manor, and holds courts leet twice in the year. The powers of the county debt-court of Machynlleth, established in 1847, extend over the registration-district of Machynlleth. This court, and the petty-sessions for the hundred, are held in the town monthly.

The parish comprises an area of 9876 acres, of which 4799 are common or waste, affording pasturage to numerous flocks of sheep, that feed on the declivities of the hills; the lower grounds are fertile and productive, and peat is found in various parts of the district. The living consists of a rectory and a vicarage, united under the provisions of an act of the 29th and 30th of Charles II.; the rectory, which was a sinecure, is rated in the king's books at £11. 10. 7½., and the vicarage at £6. 6. 0½.: patron, the Bishop of St. Asaph. The tithes have been commuted for £400 payable to the incumbent, and £3. 3. to the parish-clerk: the glebe comprises 3a. 1r. 20p., valued at £25 per annum; and there is a glebe-house. The church, dedicated to St. Peter, is a handsome structure, in a style resembling later English architecture. It was rebuilt, with the exception of the tower, in 1827, and contains 873 sittings, of which 300 are free, in consideration of a grant of £300 from the Incorporated Society for the building and enlargement of churches and chapels: the edifice is well arranged and neatly fitted up. The ancient tower, in the same year, was raised a few feet higher, and crowned with battlements and crocketed pinnacles. There are places of worship for Calvinistic and Wesleyan Methodists, Independents, and Baptists. Day and Sunday National schools were established here in 1829, by John Jones, Esq., of Upper Norton-street, London, but a native of this town, who in that year gave £1000 three per cent. consols. for their endowment. This sum is augmented by the use of a prior bequest of £200 by John Owen, Esq., for teaching children, and a grant of £40 from Ann Jones for the like purpose: the endowments of the schools altogether amount to nearly £55 per annum. Commodious buildings were erected at the same time by subscription, occupying three sides of a quadrangle, with a projection in the centre; the expense amounting to £600. In these schools, which are supported partly by the endowments, and partly by subscription, a large number of children of both sexes receive gratuitous instruction; the master and mistress have a joint salary of £60 per annum, with a house and garden rent-free, and the master is allowed to take a few pay-scholars. Ten Sunday schools are supported by the dissenters.

There are seven houses in the town inhabited from time immemorial by paupers, three of which were bequeathed by Isaac Pugh, and the others are supposed to have been the gift of Humphrey Morris. The latter donor also assigned £60, the interest to be expended partly in keeping the buildings in repair and supplying the inmates with clothing, and partly in educating and apprenticing poor children; but the portion for the repair of the houses has been lost. Several persons have at different periods left sums for the benefit of the poor, including £60 by Thomas Pugh, £40 by Rowland Owen, £20 each by Humphrey Morris, Gwen Owen, and John Davis, and other smaller benefactions; all of which were consolidated, and the amount, £190, lent on two bonds to the Montgomeryshire turnpike trusts, now yielding an interest of £9. 10. Of this income, £5 are annually distributed among the poor of the town, £1 each among those of the two townships of Uwchy-Garreg and Is-y-Garreg, and the remaining £2. 10. in apprenticing poor boys of the town. A few small charities have been lost. The poor-law union of which this place is the head, was formed January 16th, 1837, and comprises the following eleven parishes and townships; namely, Machynlleth, Is-y-Garreg, Uwch-y-Garreg, Cemmes, Dârowen, Llanbrynmair, Llanwrin, and Penegoes, in the county of Montgomery; Pennal, and Towyn, in that of Merioneth; and Scybor-y-Coed, in that of Cardigan. It is under the superintendence of fifteen guardians, and contains a population of 12,306. A savings' bank has been some time established in the town.

On a hill immediately above Penyrallt House are the remains of an ancient fortification of great strength, within sight of Cevn Caer, and commanding all the passes in the district around it. Part of the senate-house in which Owain Glyndwr assembled his parliament, is yet remaining: it was built with the slate stone of the country, and, from the appearance of the spacious entrance, which is still in good preservation, seems to have been an edifice of no mean extent. The old building called "the Garrison" is situated near the Wynnstay Arms, and it is supposed that there was formerly a subterraneous passage leading from this place to the fortification of Cevn Caer, in the adjoining parish of Pennal. Adjacent to the town is a field named the "Garshion," at the extremity of which is a copious spring, whence the inhabitants of Machynlleth are supplied with water.

Dôl Guog, near the town, was for some time the retreat of the celebrated Llywarch Hên, an eminent bard, who flourished towards the close of the sixth and at the commencement of the seventh century. He was chieftain of a part of Cumbria, or Cumberland, but having survived twenty-four of his sons, who fell in fighting the battles of their country against the Saxons, and falling into poverty in his old age, he retired, under the protection of Cynddylan, prince of part of Powys, to this place, where he devoted himself to the pursuits of poetry. He died at the advanced age of 105 years, and was buried at Llanvawr, near Bala. Many of his compositions while in retirement here, have been published in the Welsh Archæologia, and in a separate volume by Dr. Pughe. Howel Swrdwal, a Welsh bard, was minister of the parish in the fifteenth century; as was also, for many years, Ievan Llawdden, an eminent poet of the Vale of Loughor, who flourished from 1430 to 1470. Dr. Davies, head master of the grammar-school at Macclesfield, was a native of the town.



 

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